Why is exercise important for people with autism?

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Exercise can benefit kids with Autism

Can exercise help them have a better quality of life?

 

Introduction

In this article from US NEWS, we will see the importance of exercise in people with Autism. We all understand the importance of exercise, but exercise can be especially beneficial to people with Autism. New studies show that exercise can help people with Autism control some behavior issues.

 

Link to the Article

Note: Positive Autism, select the most relevant Autism News from all around the world to keep you informed. Please click below to open the article in a new tab. When done, close that tab to return to our page. Enjoy:

👉 Exercise and Autism 👈

 

Brief Summary – TL;DR

“Exercise goes beyond the health-related benefits and increased levels of physical fitness for people with autism,” said David Geslak, a pioneer in the use of exercise to help children with autism.

Research shows that exercise, in addition to providing health and fitness-related benefits, can increase concentration, improve academic performance, reduce stereotyped behaviors, and build confidence.

According to a study published in the April issue of the journal Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 10 minutes of low intensity exercise reduced verbal repetition of phases or words and hand flapping in people with autism.

“Teaching exercise to those with autism has a profound impact on the individual, their parents and the therapists or educators working with them,” he said.

Conclusion

Studies show that exercise is very important in people with autism. In addition to the benefits related to health and fitness; It helps increase concentration, improve academic performance, reduce stereotypical behaviors, and build confidence.

Exercise should be done mostly between the ages of 9 and 13, which is when children substantially decrease their active time.

Geslak suggests three strategies to help children with autism be more active: Use pictures, establish routines, choose persistence over perfection.

Just get your kids moving.

Portrait of surprised child

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